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We Need A Break from Kikuyu Presidents

26 May

Image-Kenya-ethnic-distribution-map

My Star oped this weekend:

Forty-three men have served as President of the United States with the following ethnic origins: 27 English, two English/Scottish, two English/Welsh, four Scottish, one Scottish/Irish, two Irish, three Dutch, one German and one African. This is according to the Atlas Forum.

It took more than 219 years for the first President of African origin to be elected as US head of state. This is despite the country having men and women of African ancestry for years, who would and could have served ably 10 times better than the current President.

This is no longer the case after Barack Obama was elected in 2008, and served up until last year. Kenyans should and must learn from this backward refusal of Americans to accept a Black man or woman, for that matter, as capable of leading them.

The question to ask is: Is it fair or right for a country of more than 40 tribes to be led in all of its history by sons hailing from only two communities, which have exchanged the presidency only between them?

The answer is clearly a resounding No. Since Independence, this country has been led by the Kikuyu, who have dominated the presidency, and the Kalenjin, who got in-between on account of President Jomo Kenyatta naming Daniel Moi as Vice President.

No one expected Moi to last more than the constitutionally provided 90 days within which a new President was to be elected. But, thanks to Charles Njonjo and his team, Moi quickly figured how to entrench himself as President and the rest is history.

Mwai Kibaki, another Kikuyu, succeeded Moi in 2002. Moi himself had picked another Kikuyu, Uhuru Kenyatta, to succeed him.

Upon completion of his rigged second term in office in 2013, Kibaki, in a classic asante ya punda ni teke, made sure the man who made his presidency possible could not occupy State House, by unleashing the state machine to yet again rig the man out for the second time as was successfully done in 2013.

With the dominance of these two tribes in leadership, so has been the case in the allocation of resources across the country besides jobs, which clearly and indisputably favour the Kikuyu, followed closely by the Kalenjin.

This is neither right nor fair as other communities are left to scramble for crumbles, if any at all.

One of the reasons Raila has been mercilessly opposed in the Mount Kenya region is because there are many there who believe presidential leadership belongs there and nowhere else.

This is wrong for several reasons.

First, Kenya, as in many other countries, has never embraced dynastic rule, even though one can argue that the dominance by one community in presidential leadership is no different.

Voters must reject this notion of dynastic rule come August 8.

Second, underlying the thinking among those who hold the view presidential leadership belongs to the Mt Kenya community is this sense of misguided belief that one community from that area is particularly superior to all others, which is pure nonsense.

It’s actually this kind of thinking that has created hatred and animosity among tribes of all manner in many countries, most notably Rwanda, where the 1994 Genocide is attributed to this backward superiority based ethnic and tribal divide.

Third, even though the Constitution attempts to force this issue of not having one tribe win the presidency merely due to its numeric strength, those in power have and do find ways to manipulate the system to produce an outcome they desire but this time we, as Kenyans, must be prepared to say Never Again.

There’s nothing tribalistic, divisive or discriminatory in urging we get a break from yet another Kikuyu presidency: This is just a question of fairness and fatigue anyone objective would have to agree with.

It’s our hope and prayer this shall come to pass come August 8 and we live happily thereafter as a nation.

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Posted by on May 26, 2017 in Politics

 

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